Massachusetts Chapter of the American College of Surgeons

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Using the BODY-Q to Assess Eating-related Distress and Behavior after Sleeve Gastrectomy vs Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass
Danny Mou MD1, Claire E.E. DeVries MD1, Nena Pater BA2, Lotte Poulsen MD3, Dennis Makarawung MD4, Rene M.J. Wiezer MD4, Ruben N. van Veen MD, PhD5, Maarten M. Hoogbergen MD6, Jens A. Sorensen MD, PhD6, Anne F. Klassen DPhil8, Andrea L. Pusic MD1, Ali Tavakkoli MD1
1Department of Surgery, Brigham and Womenís Hospital, Boston, MA 2Maastricht University Medical School, Maastricht, The Netherlands 3Department of Plastic Surgery, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark 4Department of Surgery, St. Antonius Hospital, Nieuwegein, The Netherlands 5Department of Surgery, OLVG West, Amsterdam, The Netherlands 6Department of Plastic Surgery, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark 7Department of Pediatrics, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON

Background: Bariatric surgery success has been traditionally defined by weight loss and medical comorbidity remission. However, this inadequately captures the patientís perspective. Patients may experience good weight loss but suffer debilitating GI symptoms. This can be captured with patient-reported outcomes measures (PROMs). We used the new BODY-Q PROM that assesses eating-related behavior and eating-related distress to compare laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) patients.
Methods: The BODY-Q assesses eating-related behaviors (e.g., self control) and eating-related distress (e.g., feeling guilty). This PROM was administered to post-operative patients at 3 hospitals in the U.S., the Netherlands, and Denmark. Chi-square statistics were used to compare the symptoms.
Results: 920 patients had RYGB and 500 had SG. Average post-operative follow-up was 16 months (Table 1). For eating-related distress, significantly more LSG patients endorsed feeling embarrassed, discouraged, or unhappy when eating while significantly more RYGB patients endorse feeling out of control when eating (P<0.05; Figure 1A). For eating-related behavior, significantly more RYGB patients felt that they could not eat healthy food, the right amount of food, or avoid unhealthy food (P<0.05). Conclusions: There are meaningful differences of PROMs after RYGB and SG. These are important to help counsel patients.


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